todealornot

Van Gogh

In Daily Meditations, Readers Choice on September 18, 2010 at 6:39 pm

Vincent van Gogh, for whom color was the chief symbol of expression, was born in Groot-Zundert, Holland. The son of a pastor, brought up in a religious and cultured atmosphere, Vincent was highly emotional and lacked self-confidence. Between 1860 and 1880, when he finally decided to become an artist, van Gogh had had two unsuitable and

unhappy romances and had worked unsuccessfully as a clerk in a bookstore, an art salesman, and a preacher in the Borinage (a dreary mining district in Belgium), where he was dismissed for overzealousness. He remained in Belgium to study art, determined to give happiness by creating beauty. The works of his early Dutch period are somber-toned, sharply lit, genre paintings of which the most famous is “The Potato Eaters” (1885). In that year van Gogh went to Antwerp where he discovered the works of Rubens and purchased many Japanese prints.

Asked about his technique, Banksy said:

ā€œ I use whatever it takes. Sometimes that just means drawing a moustache on a girl’s face on some billboard, sometimes that means sweating for days over an intricate drawing. Efficiency is the key. ā€

Stencils are traditionally hand drawn or printed onto sheets of acetate or card, before being cut out by hand. Because of the secretive nature of Banksy’s work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in his stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photocopy nature of much of his work.

He mentions in his book, Wall and Piece, that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always too slow and was either caught or could never finish the art in the one sitting. So he devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour.

Not Banksy

“The darkest thing about Africa has always been our ignorance of it”
— George H. T. Kimble, from the book ‘Inside Africa’

Inside African Art is a project run by three people, Todd in Kenya and Gathinja and Jonah in New York. We have one thing in mind: The promotion and exposure of original fine arts by African artists. Contemporary African paintings are less well known than African artifacts and traditional crafts, and there is little exposure and availability of this type of artwork either in galleries or on the internet.
Yes, there are plenty of mass-produced artworks, African crafts, and Afri-kitch available, but finding an original African painting at a reasonable price is next to impossible – and it shouldn’t be!

Inside African Art

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